Strong Start To Finish
Points of Interest

Perceived Impact

This Points of Interest shows that finding ways to more swiftly impact faculty and administrator perceptions may help bring reform efforts to scale faster with even greater impact.
September 4, 2019
Belinda Lei, Gates Bryant, Jeff Seaman, Lindsay Whitman, Salil Kelkar
Tags: Scaling, Differential Capacity of Institutions

Change is hard and implementing developmental education reform takes years. Our research shows faculty and administrator attitudes on policy shift towards a more decisive and positive stance as time goes on. In Florida, where statewide reforms occurred in 2013, 63.2% of faculty respondents reported being in a "high ideal state" and only 10% in the least ideal state. In comparison, in California - which only implemented statewide reforms in 2017-2018 - 10% fewer faculty reported an ideal state and double the number reported the least ideal state. Faculty and administrators residing in Texas - where reforms were implemented in 2015 and 2017 - fall between Florida and California in terms of attitudes toward achieving an ideal state for student outcomes at their institution.

If the first chapter of the developmental education reform movement was about institutional policy and building consensus about how to respond through a variety of rigorously evaluated demonstration projects, the next chapter will be defined by the science of effective implementation in more classrooms at more institutions. This Points of Interest shows that finding ways to more swiftly impact faculty and administrator perceptions may help bring reform efforts to scale faster and with even greater impact.