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Our Expert Advisory Board

An Expert Advisory Board – chaired by Dr. Philip Uri Treisman and composed of diverse postsecondary leaders and practitioners – will guide the campaign’s overall research and knowledge development activities.

Uri Treisman
Uri Treisman
Chair

Uri Treisman, a recognized advocate for change among postsecondary leaders nationwide, chairs the Campaign and Expert Advisory Board. Uri is professor of mathematics and of public affairs at The University of Texas at Austin. He is the founder and executive director of the University’s Charles A. Dana Center, an organized research unit of the College of Natural Sciences. His research and professional interests span mathematics and science education, education policy, social and developmental psychology, and community service and volunteerism.

James Applegate
Jim Applegate

Dr. James Applegate spent his career in higher education and philanthropy developing policies and practices to dramatically increase college success, especially for underserved groups. He currently is a visiting professor in the Center for Education Policy at Illinois State University. He previously served as the Executive Director for the Illinois Board of Higher Education. As the state higher education executive officer, Jim led a $2 billion higher education enterprise and efforts to dramatically increase college attainment, improve college affordability and close opportunity gaps in Illinois. Jim served as Vice President and head of grant making for the Lumina Foundation. There he led development of new approaches to support increased degree production, fairness and productivity in higher education. He advocated for improving education policy at the international, federal, state and institutional levels.

From 2000-08, Jim was chief academic officer at the Kentucky state higher education system office. During his tenure, Kentucky led the nation in higher education attainment increases. Jim was a professor and department chair at the University of Kentucky. He was an ACE Fellow and has served on advisory boards for numerous higher education organizations. He was a University Fellow and received his Ph.D. from the University of Illinois.

Paul Attewell
Paul Attewell

Paul Attewell is Distinguished Professor of Sociology and Urban Education at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York. His research focuses on hurdles that prevent young adults from succeeding in college. He has articles on the community college route to the B.A.; on the efficacy of bridge programs between high school and college; on the impact of summer school programs in college; on remedial coursework; and on the effect of college selectivity on undergraduates’ graduation chances.

His co-authored book Passing the Torch: Does Higher Education for the Disadvantaged Pay Off Across the Generations? received the American Educational Research Association's Outstanding Book Award and was the winner of the University of Louisville's Grawemeyer Award in Education. That book followed a cohort of low-income women who entered the City University of New York as part of the “open admissions” initiative in the early 1970s, assessed their educational and career success thirty years later, and looked at the spillover effects of the mothers’ college education on their children.

His most recent book Data Mining for the Social Sciences: An Introduction applies these new analytical methods to social science and education data.

Joe Garcia
Joe Garcia

Joe Garcia was appointed president of Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education (WICHE) in June 2016. He previously served on the WICHE Commission for nine years, including serving as its chair in 2011. He served as Lt. Governor of Colorado and as executive director of the Colorado Department of Higher Education, beginning in 2011. During his time as Lt. Governor, and as the SHEEO for Colorado, Joe focused on increasing equity in outcomes for all students, particularly those from low income backgrounds and communities of color.

Prior to being elected Lt. Governor, Joe served as President of Colorado State University-Pueblo, which was named the Outstanding Member Institution by the Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities during his tenure. He also served as President of Colorado’s second largest community college, Pikes Peak Community College, where he was twice named President of the Year by the State Student Advisory Council. His previous public service positions included serving as a member of the Cabinet of Gov. Roy Romer and as a White House appointee under President Bill Clinton at the Department of Housing and Urban Development. He also was employed in the private practice of law for 10 years at the law firm of Holme Roberts & Owen, where he became the first Hispanic partner in the 100-year history of the firm. Joe earned his B.S. in business at the University of Colorado-Boulder and his J.D. from Harvard Law School.

Brit Kirwan
Brit Kirwan

Dr. William E. “Brit” Kirwan is chancellor emeritus of the University System of Maryland (USM). He is a recognized authority on critical issues facing higher education. He served as chancellor of USM for 13 years (2002-2015); president of The Ohio State University for four years (1998-2002); and president of the University of Maryland, College Park for 10 years (1988-1998).

Currently, Brit chairs the Conference Board of the Mathematical Sciences and serves as executive director of Transforming Post-Secondary Education in Mathematics.

Brit is past chair of, among other boards, the American Council for Higher Education, the Association of Public and Land Grant Universities, and the Knight Commission on Intercollegiate Athletics.

Among Brit's many honors is the 2010 TIAA-CREF Theodore M. Hesburgh Award for Leadership Excellence. In 2009, he received the Carnegie Corporation Leadership Award. He was recently inducted into the Maryland Business and Civic Leaders Hall of fame and was elected to membership in the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 2002.

Brit received his bachelor's degree in mathematics from the University of Kentucky in 1960 and his master's and doctoral degrees in mathematics from Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, in 1962 and 1964 respectively.

Kelly Mack
Kelly Mack

Dr. Kelly Mack is the Vice President for Undergraduate STEM Education and executive director of Project Kaleidoscope at the Association of American Colleges and Universities. Prior to joining AAC&U, Kelly was the senior program director for the NSF ADVANCE Program while on loan from the University of Maryland Eastern Shore where, as a professor of biology, she taught courses in physiology and endocrinology for 17 years.

Kelly has been a champion for inclusive excellence in STEM higher education for several decades. She is responsible for leading externally funded initiatives related to this topic, securing over $20 million from federal agencies and private foundations. For her work, Kelly has been noted as one of the top 25 women in higher education by Diverse Issues – having served on numerous advisory committees and councils. Currently, she is a member of the Board of Trustees of Shimer College and a faculty fellow of Fielding Graduate University.

Kelly earned her bachelor of science in biology from UMES and, later, her Ph.D. degree from Howard University in physiology. She has had extensive training and experience in the area of cancer research, primarily on the use of novel antitumor agents in breast tumor cells.

Lindsey Malcom-Piqueux
Lindsey Malcom-Piqueux

Dr. Lindsey Malcom-Piqueux is the associate director for research and policy at the Center for Urban Education (CUE) and a research associate professor in the Rossier School of Education at the University of Southern California. Her work focuses on the ways in which higher education policy, institutions and practitioners can redress educational inequities experienced by minoritized student populations. Her primary interest centers on postsecondary access and success for women and men of color in STEM fields. Following this interest, she has conducted research in several areas including the relationship between financial aid and STEM outcomes, community college pathways to STEM degrees, STEM education at minority-serving institutions, and gender equity in STEM within minoritized racial/ethnic groups.

Prior to joining the CUE, Lindsey was on the faculty at the George Washington University and before that, at the University of California, Riverside. She received a bachelor of science in planetary science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, an master's of science in planetary science from the California Institute of Technology and a Ph.D. in urban education with an emphasis on higher education from the University of Southern California.

Alycia Marshall
Alycia Marshall

Dr. Alycia Marshall is the associate vice president for Learning and Academic Affairs and a tenured, full professor of mathematics at Anne Arundel Community College (AACC) in Arnold, Maryland. She has a Ph.D. in mathematics education from the University of Maryland College Park, a master of arts degree in teaching from Bowie State University and a Bachelor of Arts degree in mathematics from the University of Maryland, Baltimore County. Her teaching experience includes three years of high school mathematics and 17 years at the college level.

Alycia serves as the principal investigator of the Engineering Scholars Program (ESP) at AACC. The ESP program is a $600,000 grant funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF), which provides scholarships, mentoring and support services to underrepresented students pursuing engineering. Dr. Marshall was awarded the Verizon Community Innovator Award (2013) and was selected as one of the 2015 INSIGHT Into Diversity Magazine’s “100 Inspiring Women in STEM”. Additional awards include a National Faculty Role Model Award presented by Minority Access Inc. (2015) and the John and Suanne Roueche Excellence Award from the League of Innovation (2017). Alycia was recently selected as one of six Charles A. Dana Center Mathematics Pathways Leadership Fellows.

Ricardo Moena
Ricardo Moena

Dr. Ricardo Moena is the chairperson of the Transfer Module Mathematics Committee of the Ohio Department of Higher Education, and also the chair of the Ohio Mathematics Subgroup focusing on redesigning the Ohio Transfer Module (OTM) course criteria and processes. Previously, Ricardo was the chair of Math & Applied Sciences Department of the former University College of the University of Cincinnati. He is currently a professor of mathematics in the Mathematics Department of the University of Cincinnati, where he serves as assistant department head and director of entry-level mathematics. Ricardo received his Ph.D. in mathematics in 1990 from the University of Cincinnati, and an master's of science in mathematics from the University of Concepcion, Chile.

Sharon Morrissey
Sharon Morrissey

Dr. Sharon Morrissey serves as the vice chancellor for Academic Services and Research in the Virginia Community College System, where she is responsible for state-level coordination of academic programs, student success initiatives, research and reporting, and policy review and professional development for Virginia’s 23 community colleges. Sharon is leading initiatives to increase student success outcomes, across the VCCS, including development of policies for alternative placement measures, math pathways, credit for prior learning, improved transfer outcomes, and dual enrollment redesign.

Prior to joining the VCCS, Sharon served as the executive vice president for programs and chief academic officer for the North Carolina Community College System. Sharon led several systemwide student success initiatives, including developmental education redesign, structured dual enrollment pathways for high school students, dual enrollment in occupational courses leading to credentials for adult basic skills students, and development of a policy framework to support Completion by Design.

Sharon serves as an adjunct assistant professor in the Department of Education Leadership, Policy & Human Development at North Carolina State University. In previous community college roles, Sharon served as president of Richmond Community College, vice president for Instruction at Asheville-Buncombe Technical Community College, and vice president for Academic and Student Services at Fayetteville Technical Community College. She began her community college career as an English instructor at Central Carolina Community College.

Eloy Oakley
Eloy Oakley

Eloy Ortiz Oakley is the chancellor for the California Community Colleges. He was appointed by the California Community Colleges Board of Governors in December 2016. Eloy is best known for implementing innovative programs and policies that help students succeed in college. Under Eloy’s leadership, the Long Beach Community College District received numerous recognitions for efforts to improve student completion rates and for supporting a small business and entrepreneurship eco-system throughout the Southern California region.

Eloy was appointed as the superintendent-president of the Long Beach Community College District (LBCCD) in 2007. The James Irvine Foundation recognized him with their 2014 Leadership Award. Eloy was appointed to the University of California Board of Regents in 2014 where he used his experiences to better serve all Californians in higher education. In 2017, President Obama recognized him as a White House Champion of Change for efforts in the national college promise movement.

Eloy’s trailblazing efforts have been acknowledged through his appointments to the California Chamber of Commerce, the University of California Board of Regents, the Fair Shake Commission, the College Futures Foundation and the LA 2024 Advisory Board.

Eloy himself is a community college success story. After serving in the U.S. Army, he enrolled at Golden West College. He then transferred to the University of California, Irvine where he received his degrees of bachelor of arts in environmental analysis and design, and master of business administration.

Erica Orians
Erica Orians

Dr. Erica Lee Orians is the executive director of the Michigan Center for Student Success. The Center, which is funded by the Kresge Foundation and the members of the Michigan Community College Association, is focused on building state-level capacity to support campus-based innovations and creating a tighter link between practice, research and policy to promote student success.

Prior to this role in Michigan, Erica was senior research associate at the Utah Education Policy Center (UEPC) at the University of Utah. In her role at the UEPC, Erica served as the Research Coordinator for the Utah Data Alliance, Utah's statewide longitudinal data system, where she leveraged K-12 education, postsecondary education and workforce data to analyze student outcomes throughout the education pipeline. Erica has also held positions in student affairs and academic advising at The Ohio State University, Miami University, Middletown campus and the Columbus College of Arts and Design.

Erica earned her Ph.D. in educational leadership and policy from the University of Utah. Her research focuses on economic and financial issues in community colleges, and her dissertation focused on benchmarking and efficiency among rural community colleges. She earned her master's of public administration in higher education and student affairs from The Ohio State University.

Kim Hunter Reed
Kim Reed

Dr. Kim Hunter Reed was confirmed as executive director of the Colorado Department of Higher Education on March 7, 2017. Kim, a former Louisiana higher education official, recently served in President Obama’s administration as deputy undersecretary at the U.S. Department of Education, where she led postsecondary diversity and inclusion work and the White House Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities. Previously, Kim was a principal at HCM Strategists LLC, a public policy and advocacy consulting firm in Washington, D.C.

Kim has extensive higher education and government experience. She chaired Louisiana's higher education transition team in 2015 and served as Louisiana's state policy director. Kim was chief of staff for the Louisiana Board of Regents and executive vice president of the University of Louisiana System. Prior to those roles, she taught at Southern University and was executive assistant to the president and interim vice president of student affairs at Southeastern Louisiana University.

Kim received a doctorate in public policy from Southern University as well as a master’s of public administration and a bachelor’s degree in broadcast journalism from Louisiana State University.

Kim is a wife, proud volleyball mom and relentless student advocate.

Nancy Zimpher
Nancy Zimpher

Nancy L. Zimpher became the 12th chancellor of The State University of New York, the nation’s largest comprehensive system of higher education in 2009. At SUNY, Nancy implemented sweeping reforms that ensure SUNY can provide broad access to higher education while maximizing its impact as an engine of economic revitalization and innovation across the state.

Nancy is active in numerous national education organizations, and is a renowned leader in the areas of teacher preparation, urban education and university-community engagement. In addition to her role at SUNY, she has also served as chair of the Board of Governors of the New York Academy of Sciences, the National Association of System Heads, the Coalition of Urban Serving Universities and CEOs for Cities. As co-founder of StriveTogether, Nancy has been instrumental in creating a national network of innovative partnerships that address challenges across the education pipeline.

Prior to coming to SUNY, Nancy served as president of the University of Cincinnati, chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, and executive dean of the Professional Colleges and dean of the College of Education at The Ohio State University.